What's new? After more than 12 months of debate, the Investigatory Powers Bill (dubbed by the media, like all interception legislation, as the 'Snooper's Charter') passed through its final stages in the House of Lords on 16 November, granting the government surveillance powers described by US whistle-blower Edward Snowden as "the most extreme … in the history of western democracy.” The Bill is designed to future proof law enforcement powers in the face of ever-evolving forms of digital communication. It covers the following:
  • General privacy protections
  • Lawful interception of communications
  • Authorisations for obtaining communications data
  • Retention of communications data
  • Equipment interference
  • Bulk warrants
  • Bulk personal dataset warrants
  • Oversight arrangements
Background Upon receiving Royal Assent, the date of which is still unclear, the Bill will mark a major overhaul of the UK's regimes on communications data retention and law enforcement access rules. As Datonomy readers will be familiar, the new legislation has been under discussion for many years under successive governments … Continue Reading ››
The Information Commissioner's Office (ICO), the UK's data protection regulator, is cracking down on the online gambling sector's use of personal data to promote online gambling. It has contacted around 400 companies to threaten them with fines of up to £500,000 if they are found to be collecting and using personal data for marketing in a manner which does not comply with the Data Protection Act 1998 (DPA) and the Privacy and Electronic Communications Regulations 2003 (PECR). In its press release, the ICO said it is writing to over 400 companies, all believed to be egaming marketing affiliates, demanding they set out how they use people’s personal details and send marketing texts, including where they got people’s personal information from and how many texts they sent. What is the ICO worried about? The ICO has expressed concern that the prolific use of affiliate marketing is resulting in a lack of accountability, … Continue Reading ››