Category Archives: European Commission

In order to support the application of the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) the European Commission’s Directorate-General for Justice and Consumers is establishing a new expert group to be comprised of various stakeholders including academics, legal practitioners and organisations. The 27-member group will support the early preparation of possible implementing and/or delegated acts, and provide stakeholders with an opportunity to share their experiences in applying the GDPR. As Datonomy readers will already be familiar, there are a number of issues in the GDPR where there is scope for the detailed application to be fleshed out by means of these Commission-made measures. Organisations may well want to take the opportunity to influence this detail. Specifically, this year the Commission intends to launch studies on certification mechanisms and standardised icons in order to assess whether there would be added value in adopting delegated and/or implementing acts in these areas. The Commission would therefore … Continue Reading ››
Since its hotly awaited publication in January, the Proposal for an ePrivacy Regulation ("Proposal") has come under scrutiny from various stakeholders. Recently both the Article 29 Working Party ("WP29"), and the European Data Protection Supervisor ("EDPS"), have joined the chorus. Though both independent bodies are pleased with the concepts in the legislation, both express various concerns, with WP29 describing theirs as particularly 'grave'. Those (grave) concerns, alongside some recommendations are explored in detail below. EDPS: concerns over consent, tracking and cookies. As expected in his Opinion the EDPS welcomes various parts of the Proposal, including the legislators' choice for a regulation rather than a directive, and the extension of scope to over-the-top (“OTT”) communications services such as Skype and WhatsApp. The Commission's ambition to bring all publically accessible networks and services within the scope of the confidentiality requirements is also praised. However, though the EDPS … Continue Reading ››
Impact of Brexit on data protection: EU Home Affairs Sub-Committee hears evidence The EU Home Affairs Sub-Committee continues to hear evidence from various experts on the implications of Brexit on the "EU data protection package". Particularly notable are the comments of Elizabeth Denham, the UK's Information Commissioner, regarding her hopes for the UK post-Brexit. Unsurprisingly for Denham and perhaps reassuringly for business, "the right way forward… is to fully adopt the general data protection regulation". However should the UK do so, questions persist as to the ICO's role, particularly in relation to its standing with the European Data Protection Board (EDPB). Denham was keen to emphasise that the Government should do anything it can to ensure the ICO has "some status" on the EDPB. Should it not, the UK will be at the mercy of the Board's decisions, but be without influence over its policy. Lord O'Neil of Clackmannan, a Labour peer, was … Continue Reading ››
Yesterday, 10 January, the European Commission (EC) presented its formal proposals for the new ePrivacy Regulation. On initial analysis, the first official draft of the Regulation appears broadly similar to last month's leaked version, explored by Datonomy here. Datonomy will be providing a fuller analysis, however in the meantime the EC's Fact Sheet provides a useful starting point. The Commission's aim is to have the new Regulation adopted by 25 May 2018 when the GDPR takes effect. Olswang's Head of Digital and Data, Elle Todd, and Alex Dixie, the firm's Head of Adtech, will be taking a first look at the practical impacts of the new proposals in a webinar at 15:00 UK time on Thursday 19 January. Follow this link to register. In particular the webinar will examine:
Yesterday (13 December) in time-honoured tradition, a draft proposal of the European Commission's (EC) new ePrivacy Regulation was leaked. The official draft of the proposal is not expected to be published by the EC until January 2017, and it is possible some of the detail will change before then. Datonomy will be providing fuller analysis of the real thing in the near future, but an initial look at the leaked draft – which (typos aside) gives a good indication of what to expect - reveals the following:
  1. It's a Regulation rather than a Directive (as predicted by Datonomy here)
As with the GDPR, this is intended to provide additional harmonisation and simplification. However, there are a number of areas where Member States can nuance provisions.
  1. A fining regime similar to GDPR
Offenders can expect turnover based fines. For example, fines of up to 2% of turnover, or up to 10,000,000 … Continue Reading ››
Recently Datonomy attended the second of two conferences held by Exeter University addressing the UK's place in the Digital Single Market. The day, hosted at Portcullis House, focused on data protection and privacy policy with viewpoints provided by both practitioners and stakeholders. Of particular relevance to Datonomy readers were the panels' opinions on the ePrivacy Directive review, the GDPR, and the new Investigatory Powers Act (recently explored by Datonomy here). Draft ePrivacy Regulation on the horizon Perhaps the headline news from the day was the strong support for the review of the ePrivacy Directive to result in the implementation of a new ePrivacy Regulation (therefore directly effective). It was argued the Regulation should extend the scope of the current ePrivacy Directive to cover new tech including, for example, OTT Providers, publically used private networks and the Internet of Things. According to the European Commission the draft proposal … Continue Reading ››
In the past year, we have seen Safe Harbor declared invalid and the EU-US Privacy Shield put in place, as well as the start of the countdown to GDPR compliance. Datonomy contributors Elle Todd and Rob Bratby join Jamie Davies from Telecom to discuss all things data and reflect on the changes to EU data protection regulation over the past twelve months. Find the article here.