Tag Archives: privacy.

With the GDPR on the horizon, the EU is now overhauling and expanding the reach of the more specific privacy rules which relate to direct marketing, cookies and other forms of online monitoring. The ability of social media and messaging services to track users is one of many areas touched on in the European Commission's newly proposed ePrivacy Regulation, which was officially unveiled last week. We highlight some key impacts for the tech and media sectors, provided the proposed draft passes through the legislative process without dramatic changes. Businesses should incorporate these new requirements into their GDPR readiness planning. Why are the rules being updated?
  • The regime for electronic communications, based on the EU's Privacy and E-communications Directive (PECD), which dates back to 2002, is being overhauled as part of the Commission's Digital Single Market package.
  • Since the last review of the PECD in 2009, a new … Continue Reading ››
 ‘If men were angels, no government would be necessary. If angels were to govern men, neither external nor internal controls on government would be necessary. In framing a government which is to be administered by men over men, the great difficulty lies in this: you must first enable the government to control the governed; and in the next place oblige it to control itself'. James Madison, 1788 (highlighted in the AG's opinion) Enabling a government to control the governed, whilst obliging it to control itself, is the dilemma with which the European Court of Justice (ECJ) has been faced in its preliminary ruling on the appeal decisions of Tele2 and Watson. In today's ruling against the UK Government, the ECJ has clarified that national governments need to respect EU standards on data retention in their domestic legislation. The ruling is a potentially embarrassing setback for Theresa May, as … Continue Reading ››
Yesterday (13 December) in time-honoured tradition, a draft proposal of the European Commission's (EC) new ePrivacy Regulation was leaked. The official draft of the proposal is not expected to be published by the EC until January 2017, and it is possible some of the detail will change before then. Datonomy will be providing fuller analysis of the real thing in the near future, but an initial look at the leaked draft – which (typos aside) gives a good indication of what to expect - reveals the following:
  1. It's a Regulation rather than a Directive (as predicted by Datonomy here)
As with the GDPR, this is intended to provide additional harmonisation and simplification. However, there are a number of areas where Member States can nuance provisions.
  1. A fining regime similar to GDPR
Offenders can expect turnover based fines. For example, fines of up to 2% of turnover, or up to 10,000,000 … Continue Reading ››
Last week, as part of Olswang's GDPR readiness and Talking Retail webinar series', lawyers from the firm's data protection and retail sector teams hosted a webinar looking at the implications of the GDPR on the use of data by the retail industry during an online transaction.  In this session our speakers looked at the following:
  • Targeted and non-targeted advertising
  • Privacy policies
  • Processing customer payment details
  • Post purchase analysis
  • Data breaches
  • GDPR implementation
The webinar was hosted by Katie Nagy de Nagybaczon, a partner in the Corporate Team, who focuses on the retail, eCommerce and technology sectors. The two speakers were:
  • Sven Schonhofen, an associate in the Commercial Team of the Munich office. He specializes in advising clients in all areas of IT law, in particular on data protection law.
  • Emily Dorotheou, an associate in the Commercial Team who has experience of working on procurement, technology and logistics contracts for a variety of retail and technology clients.
Please follow this … Continue Reading ››
On 14 July 2016, the US Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit ruled that Microsoft cannot be forced by US law enforcement to hand over customer emails stored in its Ireland data centre. At stake were fundamental questions about privacy in the cloud. The decision has been hailed by the technology sector and privacy campaigners around the world as a global milestone for the advancement of laws balancing the legitimate interests of law enforcement and individuals' right to privacy. But what does a US Court decision about data on a server in Ireland mean for cloud in Asia? In this post, we look at the Court's decision and why it is good news for the whole cloud ecosystem in Asia. What was the case about? The case centred on a warrant issued by US law enforcement in a narcotics case. The warrant required Microsoft to hand over emails that were stored … Continue Reading ››
For some time before the election in May there was a convergence of quite varied interests on privacy issues, and this convergence now seems to have disappeared, or altered in a way not yet clear or visible. The public debate today is dominated by the budgetary question of the structural deficit and the cuts to public services that are required to remove or reduce the deficit. The Big Ticket privacy issues (ie the ID card and ContactPoint) were dealt with by the Coalition quite rapidly, but is that it, for the moment at least? The key connected debate is on the Smaller State and/or the Big Society. The relationship between them isn’t clear, but while the State might be on the retreat, that doesn’t mean it will be any less privacy invasive for those who still come within its ambit (most of us). There will still be plenty of reasons, for instance, … Continue Reading ››