Tag Archives: UK

What's new? After more than 12 months of debate, the Investigatory Powers Bill (dubbed by the media, like all interception legislation, as the 'Snooper's Charter') passed through its final stages in the House of Lords on 16 November, granting the government surveillance powers described by US whistle-blower Edward Snowden as "the most extreme … in the history of western democracy.” The Bill is designed to future proof law enforcement powers in the face of ever-evolving forms of digital communication. It covers the following:
  • General privacy protections
  • Lawful interception of communications
  • Authorisations for obtaining communications data
  • Retention of communications data
  • Equipment interference
  • Bulk warrants
  • Bulk personal dataset warrants
  • Oversight arrangements
Background Upon receiving Royal Assent, the date of which is still unclear, the Bill will mark a major overhaul of the UK's regimes on communications data retention and law enforcement access rules. As Datonomy readers will be familiar, the new legislation has been under discussion for many years under successive governments … Continue Reading ››
The latest round up of legal and regulatory developments and other news on cybersecurity from the Datonomy blogging team at Olswang LLP. UK policy and regulatory developments
  • Election special: It will be interesting to see what the new Conservative Government means for cybersecurity. The Conservative manifesto pledged to continue investment in cyber defence capabilities and improve response to cyber crime with reforms to police training (including the use of volunteer  “Cyber Specials”).  Datonomy will be looking out for new policy announcements - the state opening of Parliament and the Queen’s Speech will be on 27 May.  In terms of ministerial appointments which may have a bearing on cyber policy, these include: Matt Hancock, who has replaced Francis Maude as Minister for the Cabinet Office, Oliver Letwin who is in overall charge of the Cabinet Office and Sajid Javid, the new  Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills.
  • On 7 May the … Continue Reading ››
Although the UK's Information Commissioner handed out monetary penalties for serious breaches of the Data Protection Act for the first time this week, a new survey has suggested that UK consumers support even tougher sanctions for organisations that are guilty of losing personal data. In a poll of 5000 consumers, conducted for LogRhythm by OnePoll, 62 percent of consumers felt that organisations should receive large fines for data loss with 31 percent going as far as to suggest company directors should be subject to criminal proceedings. Further information about the survey and its findings can be found at the following URL: http://www.logrhythm.com/Company/PressReleases/UKsupportscompulsorydatalossdisclosure.aspx